The Epoch Times: Australia Offered Help Long Before NYT Claim: ‘Trump Pressed Australian Leader’

Details have emerged that contradict a loaded Sept. 30 New York Times report that claimed President Donald Trump “pressed” Australia’s leader and used “American diplomacy for potential personal gain.”

The New York Times ran a report late Sept. 30 citing two anonymous U.S. officials who said President Donald Trump “pushed” and “pressed” Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison in a recent telephone call to help Attorney General William Barr in the Department of Justice’s (DOJ) probe into origins of the Russia investigation. One of the sources said that Barr had asked Trump to speak to Morrison.

Source: Australia Offered Help Long Before NYT Claim: ‘Trump Pressed Australian Leader’

The New York Times: Police Fire Tear Gas to Quell Protests Over Puerto Rico’s Governor

The tense confrontations marked an escalation of the dramatic political crisis that began in Puerto Rico after hundreds of pages of a private chat on the messaging app Telegram between Mr. Rosselló and some of his closest aides were leaked on Saturday, revealing a slew of crude and inappropriate exchanges.

The leak, coming on the heels of high-profile federal corruption arrests last week, unleashed months of pent-up frustration over Mr. Rosselló’s handling of Hurricane Maria, his education policies and the federal oversight board that controls Puerto Rico’s troubled finances.

“The chat was the final straw,” said Norma Jean Colberg, 58, one of the protesters.

Source: Police Fire Tear Gas to Quell Protests Over Puerto Rico’s Governor – The New York Times

The New York Times: Opinion | The Treatment of Migrants Likely ‘Meets the Definition of a Mass Atrocity’

The left wing wants to dox federal employees… I do think there’s a crime in that.

The identities of the individual Customs and Border Protection agents who are physically separating children from their families and staffing the detention centers are not undiscoverable. Immigration lawyers have agent names; journalists reporting at the border have names, photos and even videos. These agents’ actions should be publicized, particularly in their home communities.

This is not an argument for doxxing — it’s about exposure of their participation in atrocities to audiences whose opinion they care about.

Source: Opinion | The Treatment of Migrants Likely ‘Meets the Definition of a Mass Atrocity’ – The New York Times

The New York Times: Mexico Cracks Down on Migrants, After Pressure From Trump to Act

Unless you’re an idiot, you always knew this was part of Trump’s plan

They arrived at dusk, dressed for combat, pouring from government vehicles. A phalanx of military and police personnel swarmed a small hotel in the center of Tapachula, this scrappy city near Mexico’s border with Guatemala. Their target: undocumented migrants.

Agents rushed door to door, hauling people away, while migrants shouted or ran out the back, scampering over the rooftops of neighboring homes, witnesses said.

It was one of several raids here last week to sweep up migrants, part of a broad Mexican crackdown against the surge of Central Americans and others streaming toward the United States. In recent weeks, the Mexican authorities have been breaking up migrant caravans and setting up round-the-clock roadblocks along common routes north.

Detentions and deportations in Mexico are multiplying quickly, sowing fear among the many thousands of Central Americans and others crowding the migrant shelters and budget hotels here in southern Mexico, most of them hoping to reach the American border.

Source: Mexico Cracks Down on Migrants, After Pressure From Trump to Act – The New York Times

The New York Times: Twitter Takes Down Accounts of China Dissidents Ahead of Tienanmen Anniversary

Twitter is evil, and people who continue to use it are abetting evil.

Three days before the most sensitive political anniversary on the Chinese calendar, Twitter suspended the accounts of Chinese political commentators in what it said was an accident. The move showed starkly the global political ramifications of Silicon Valley slip-ups.

Twitter’s action, which one human rights worker said affected more than 100 users, came over several hours late Friday and early Saturday. It hit human rights lawyers, activists, college students and nationalists, who use workarounds to get access to Twitter, which is banned in China. Just about every part of the raucous, if small, Chinese-language Twitter world was affected.

Source: Twitter Takes Down Accounts of China Dissidents Ahead of Tiananmen Anniversary – The New York Times

The New York Times: America’s Cities Are Unlivable. Blame Wealthy Liberals

Rich left wingers actually living the way they demand of the rest of us?

Surely you jest.

To live in California at this time is to experience every day the cryptic phrase that George W. Bush once used to describe the invasion of Iraq: “Catastrophic success.” The economy here is booming, but no one feels especially good about it. When the cost of living is taken into account, billionaire-brimming California ranks as the most poverty-stricken state, with a fifth of the population struggling to get by. Since 2010, migration out of California has surged.

The basic problem is the steady collapse of livability. Across my home state, traffic and transportation is a developing-world nightmare. Child care and education seem impossible for all but the wealthiest. The problems of affordable housing and homelessness have surpassed all superlatives — what was a crisis is now an emergency that feels like a dystopian showcase of American inequality.

Source: Opinion | America’s Cities Are Unlivable. Blame Wealthy Liberals. – The New York Times

Columbia Journalism Review: Report reveals new details about DOJ’s seizing of AP phone records

And you can be assured democrats won’t care one bit. Attacks on a free press are only bad when it hurts democrats.

Now I’m not saying republicans are any better, but they were never supposed to be the defenders of free speech. That was supposed to be democrats.

In 2013, the Justice Department launched a brazen attack on press freedom, issuing sweeping subpoenas for the phone records of the Associated Press and several of its reporters and editors as part of a leak investigation. At the time, the subpoenas were widely seen as a massive intrusion into newsgathering operations. Last month, we learned that they told only part of the story.

A new report obtained by the Knight First Amendment Institute at Columbia University and the Freedom of the Press Foundation (where the authors work) under the Freedom of Information Act shows that the DOJ’s actions against the AP were broader than previously known, and that the DOJ considered subpoenaing the phone records of other news organizations, including The Washington Post, The New York Times, and ABC News. Moreover, they reveal how narrowly the DOJ interprets the Media Guidelines, the agency’s internal rules for obtaining reporters’ data.

Source: Report reveals new details about DOJ’s seizing of AP phone records – Columbia Journalism Review